Working time law

Working hours have been regulated in the Working Hours Act (ArbZG) since 1994. It serves to ensure the safety and health protection of employees in the organization of working hours and to improve the framework conditions for flexible working hours and to protect Sundays and public holidays. Regulations are z. B .:

Working time (§ 3 ArbZG)

The working day of the employee may not exceed 8 hours. It can only be extended to up to 10 hours if within 6 calendar months or within 24 weeks an average of 8 hours on working days is not exceeded.

Rest breaks (§ 4 ArbZG)

The work is to be interrupted by fixed breaks of at least 30 minutes for working hours of more than 6 hours up to 9 hours and 45 minutes for working hours of more than 9 hours. They can be divided into periods of at least 15 minutes each. Employment without a break is not permitted for more than 6 hours in a row.

Rest time (§ 5 ArbZG)

Employees must have an uninterrupted rest period of at least 11 hours after the end of their daily working hours. There are z. B. Exceptions for hospitals.

Night work (§ 6 ArbZG)

The working day of night workers may not exceed 8 hours. It can only be extended to up to 10 hours if an average of 8 hours are not exceeded on working days within a calendar month or within 4 weeks.

Work on Sundays and public holidays (Section 9 ArbZG)

Employees may not be employed on Sundays and public holidays from midnight to midnight. If the work cannot be carried out on working days, employees may be employed in certain facilities on Sundays and public holidays as well as with production work if the work permitted as a result of the interruption of production requires the use of more workers than with continuous production. At least 15 Sundays a year must remain free from work (Section 11 ArbZG).

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